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Archive: December 2017

Bronchiectasis and NTM 101 Town Hall Recording

Posted on December 28, 2017   |   
Author: Gretchen   |   
1 Comments   |   
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Bronchiectasis and NTM 101 Town Hall Recording

We hope you were able to join us for our December 2017 Bronchiectasis and NTM 101: The Basics Town Hall Teleconference. We are pleased to offer you the full recording from this event below. The recording is free and can be accessed at any time.

During the 60-minute teleconference, expert speaker Dr. Kevin Winthrop offered an overview of bronchiectasis and NTM- what are these conditions and how do they relate to one another? What causes them? What are common symptoms of both conditions? He then discussed diagnosis and treatment in detail. There were two live question and answer sessions during the call comprising more than one-third of the hour.

More About Your Expert Speaker

Kevin Winthrop

Dr. Kevin Winthrop
Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA

Kevin L. Winthrop is a Professor of Public Health and Associate Professor of Infectious Diseases and Ophthalmology at the School of Public Health and School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland, OR, USA.

Dr. Winthrop received his undergraduate degree in biology from Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA and his medical degree from OHSU. He completed his internal medicine residency training at Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR. He completed an infectious disease epidemiology fellowship at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2003, Dr. Winthrop was conferred a masters in public health from the University of California, Berkley, CA, USA. In 2006, Dr. Winthrop returned to OHSU as Assistant Professor before progressing to his current appointment in 2012.

A former infectious disease epidemiologist in the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination at the CDC, Dr. Winthrop has co-authored more than 170 publications, many regarding the epidemiologic and clinical aspects of opportunistic infections associated with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, particularly those related to biologic immunosuppressive therapies.

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Tags: Bronchiectasis Kevin Winthrop NTM Town Hall
Categories: Awareness

Is it possible that eating various foods can slow a lung function decline?

Posted on December 26, 2017   |   
Author: Gretchen   |   
3 Comments   |   
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Certain foods may slow declining lung function in smokers, nonsmokers, research suggests

NEWS WEEK (12/21, Matthews) reports that research suggests “certain foods may slow declining lung function both in smokers and nonsmokers.

The ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION (12/21, Parker) reports that investigators examined the diet and lung function of more than 650 adults in 2002, following up with the individuals 10 years later. The study participants completed a questionnaire, which assessed their eating habits, and they also underwent spirometry, a procedure that measures the capacity of lungs to take in oxygen.&

HEALTHY (12/21, Preidt) reports that investigators found that people who ate an average of more than two tomatoes or more than three portions of fresh fruit a day, especially apples, had a slower decline in lung function than those who ate less than one tomato or less than one portion of fruit a day. The link between diet and slower reductions in lung function was even more striking among former smokers, suggesting that nutrients in tomatoes and fresh fruit may help repair lung damage caused by smoking. The FINDINGS were published in the European Respiratory Journal.


 


 

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Tags: healthy eating lung function
Categories: Research

The FDA Wants to Hear From You

Posted on December 21, 2017   |   
Author: Gretchen   |   
2 Comments   |   
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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for deciding if new drugs and medical devices are safe and effective based on data typically produced by years of clinical trials. But, did you know that the FDA also considers information provided by patients when deciding whether to approve a new treatment or device?

Currently, there are no treatments that the FDA has approved specifically for bronchiectasis. On January 11th, 2018 the FDA will convene a meeting of the Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee to review the potential new treatment, Linhaliq, and make a recommendation to the FDA on whether or not to approve it for the treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE) patients with chronic lung infections withPseudomonas aeruginosa. The new treatment is made by Aradigm. It is an inhaled version of ciprofloxacin that has undergone several clinical trials to evaluate if it extends the time to the first exacerbation compared to a placebo treatment. The potential to have new treatments indicated specifically for those with chronic lung infections with pseudomonas aeruginosa is particularly important for patients, because patients report a worse quality of life and have more hospital stays when pseudomonas aeruginosa is present.

Only you can truly help the Advisory Committee members who will review the new treatment understand what the unmet medical need is and what living with bronchiectasis is like. What type of impact do frequent lung infections and hospitalizations have on you? How are you currently managing your disease and what type of burden does that treatment place on you? How often do you end up on IV antibiotics every year?

These are just a few of the questions that you can address by participating in an open call for written comments leading up to the January 11th FDA hearing. During the meeting, the Advisory Committee is only able to set aside about an hour for public comments, which means not everyone at the meeting will have the opportunity to speak. Written comments are a great way to ensure that your voice can still be heard and your perspectives on life with bronchiectasis can be considered by the Advisory Committee members. At the end of the meeting, the Advisory Committee members vote on a series of questions that amount to a recommendation on whether the FDA should approve the new treatment. It is then up the FDA to make an official decision, but it is rare that they go against the recommendation of an Advisory Committee, making the opportunity to share your experiences with the disease even more important.

Ready to write a letter to the FDA? Here are a few tips to think about when writing.


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Tags: Bronchiectasis Drugs FDA Medical Devices
Categories: Research

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